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Jul. 9, 2013 | 0 Comments0 Comments

The frustration I felt during a recent interaction with my cable company got me thinking about customer service as a whole. Like many other people, I automatically assume I’ll get the runaround from customer service and have accepted the idea that, “You set up the hoops and I’ll jump through them.” It got me thinking - How can we better service customers? At the end of the day, I want all my customers feeling, “Hey- that was actually easy.”

May. 16, 2013 | 0 Comments0 Comments

I recently co-presented with one of our customers, Jon Kesman of Reed Elsevier, at the ISM Conference in Dallas. This large annual event, which is geared toward supply chain management professionals, covered a myriad of topics, and our presentation was part of the Services Procurement track.

Apr. 10, 2013 | 0 Comments0 Comments

Today is the first post in a new series called “Bridging the Gap” where we’ll explore the various relationships within a contingent workforce program.

In my earlier blog post, I talked about collaboration between the hiring manager and the PMO and stressed the importance of creating a “feedback loop” so users have a way to share their experiences with the program on a consistent basis. In the same way it’s imperative to a program’s success for everyday users to communicate with the PMO, it’s equally imperative to have the same sort of open dialogue with suppliers.

Mar. 20, 2013 | 0 Comments0 Comments

Today's is the first post in a new series called "Bridging the Gap" where we'll explore the various relationships within a contingent workforce program.

In my six years here at Fieldglass, I have had the benefit of working with many different customers and have seen a variety of different program structures. Across the board, a program’s success usually comes down to three key things: collaboration between the hiring manager and the program office; remembering KISS principles (we’ll talk about what that means later); and seeking to understand rather than seeking to be understood.

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